artandsciencejournal:

THE ART PROCESS:
Psychedelic Art - Part I

The first time I laid eyes on Leif Podhajsky’s art, my pupils dilated so large that they may as well have gotten stuck that way because I’ve been seeing things hypersensitivly* ever since. (*not a real word)

I’m sure this man is considered a god in some type of alternate world and I’d certainly bow to him. His work is deeply concerned with nature to the point of creating within what I like to call a sub-nature or possibly a post-nature. I say this because nothing in his images feel like anything he’s showing us can be real, aside from the objects we have some previous relationship to. In short, he is bending our human relationship with what we’ve accepted as reality. 

It’s mostly the geometry which controls the ease of these images, making them so to damn good to look at. Despite somewhat troubling or melancholic themes, there’s a comfort here with soothing tones and fluid lines. Some of Leif’s images feel like you may just fall into them, and others feel like you might become them; psychedelic art is like drugs without the drugs. 

I’ve spent hours looking at his reality-altering images having read literally nothing about who he is and where he came from. His work speaks on so many frequencies that I didn’t feel the need to read into the human behind it, though for the informative value of this post, I’ll direct you to this interview by Flur magazine. 

- Jess Petrella

myodos:

Bridge Crossing (by Christopher Frank Beitz)

Prints fro this photo are available here and here. 

myodos:

Bridge Crossing (by Christopher Frank Beitz)


Prints fro this photo are available here and here


designcloud:

The Leaving by Peter Madden, 2008

Auckland-based artist Peter Madden gleans found images from old encyclopedias, back issues of National Geographic, and nature books to create his dense and nearly psychedelic collages suspended in perspex, also known as ‘safety glass’. Of his work Madden says “I consider myself a ‘Sculptographer’; a ‘post-conceptual photographer’. A mediator between genres and dimensions, between you, the other and I. I suppose I am an altogether different collagist, maybe a collagist of difference.” To see much more of his three dimensional work, check out this gallery

mounts:

Claire Morgan’s ‘Fluid’ installation features rotting strawberries and a taxidermied crow who has fallen to his death. And yes- these are real strawberries. Many interesting things going on in this piece, including the uses of movement and scale.

mounts:

Claire Morgan’s ‘Fluid’ installation features rotting strawberries and a taxidermied crow who has fallen to his death. And yes- these are real strawberries. Many interesting things going on in this piece, including the uses of movement and scale.

shauninprogress:

People have been curious about the process of my work, so I thought I’d show a few front/backs and how they relate. With a few exceptions, all designs are planned out by hand on the backs of each piece, in pencil.